April 8 Speakers

the right to housing: land in the hands of the people

MAXWELL CIARDULLO

Maxwell Ciardullo is the Director of Policy and Communications for the Greater New Orleans Fair Housing Action Center (GNOFHAC). At GNOFHAC he leads the organization’s legislative, regulatory, and communications work at the local, state, and federal levels related to policies that encourage fair housing choice and decrease segregation. Prior to joining GNOFHAC, he served as a health care access policy fellow with the New Orleans Health Department as part of the White House Strong Cities, Strong Communities initiative. Maxwell holds a master’s degree in regional planning from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst and an undergraduate degree in Sociology from the University of Illinois, Champaign-Urbana.

HAIYAN KHAN

Haiyan Khan, a graduate of Kellogg Graduate School of Management is the founder of Never Homeless Again & Santosha Village. He hopes to be part of creative solutions to address the homelessness. Haiyan has extensive experience in development and analytics and hopes to use these skills to fight homelessness in New Orleans.

JULIUS KIMBROUGH

Crescent City Community Land Trust (CCCLT) Executive Director Julius E. Kimbrough, Jr. is a native New Orleanian who has worked in community development and finance for many years, both locally and in cities across the country.  Before joining CCCLT, Julius led the community development unit of Liberty Bank and Trust Company wherein he helped provide financing to many low-to-moderate income families and to many businesses and agencies that both employ and provide services to low-to-moderate income individuals.  He has also worked as a program officer, urban planner, economic research analyst and as an investment banker. Julius graduated from Hampton University in 1993 with a degree in History and he holds master’s degrees in both Business Administration and Public Policy from the University of Chicago.

BRYAN LEE JR

Bryan Lee Jr. is currently the Civic Design Director at the Arts Council of New Orleans. Bryan is an Architectural Designer with 8 years in the field working on all phases of architectural design. His experience includes work on projects ranging from residential and academic to commercial, federal and institutional buildings, primarily in the New Orleans region. Before joining the Arts Council, Mr. Lee spent time at the 2014 AIA National Firm of the Year, Eskew+Dumez+Ripple (Architecture) in New Orleans, Billes Partners (Architecture) in New Orleans, and as an architectural multimedia consultant focusing on small scale architectural design renderings, websites, photography and corporate identity work in the New York and New Jersey areas. Since moving to New Orleans, Bryan has been a vocal advocate for Public Interest/Social Impact design through Arts, Public Place-making, and Architecture initiatives in the city. Mr. Lee is a devoted member of the National Organization of Minority Architects (NOMA) and the 2014 NOMA Member of the year. Bryan currently serves as Vice-President/President-Elect of the NOMA Louisiana Chapter and was instrumental in the chapter being acknowledged as the 2014 chapter of the year.

LISA RICHARDSON

Lisa Richardson rejoined the IWES staff in July 2013. Prior to this, she served as the National Director of Southern Access Project for Planned Parenthood Federation of America, a consultant, program director, and evaluator for a variety of organizations including Emory University, the Carter Presidential Center, and the New Orleans-based education program, Students at the Center. Lisa was a Visiting Professor at Florida State University in the Urban and Regional Planning department, and an Assistant Professor at California State University Northridge in the Urban Studies and Pan-African Studies Departments. She received her Ph.D. in 2002 at the University of New Orleans as a Board of Regents Fellow, and her Master of Science in 1996 from Georgia State University. Her interests include community development, analyzing social determinants of health, sexual health education and advocacy (particularly for women of color and youth), and participatory action research. After leaving New Orleans for academia, Lisa returned to her adopted home in 2005 to serve as the Interim Executive Director of IWES in the immediate aftermath of Hurricane Katrina.

 

coastal louisiana’s frontline communities

THERESA DARDAR

Theresa Dardar is the Vice President of the First People’s Conservation Council and member of the Pointe au Chien Tribe.

KATIE DEHART

Katie DeHart is a member of the Isle de Jean Charles Band of Biloxi-Chitimacha-Choctaw Indians.

ALESSANDRA JEROLLEMAN PhD MPA CFM

Alessandra Jerolleman is a subject matter expert in climate adaptation, hazard mitigation, and resilience with a long history of working in the public, private, and nonprofit sectors. Dr. Jerolleman is the Vice President of Louisiana Water Works where she works on projects related to integrated water management and resilience. She is also currently supporting the flood recovery efforts in Baton Rouge with FEMA and supporting climate adaptation efforts for local communities along the Gulf Coast with the Lowlander Center. She currently teaches for Tulane University, the University of New Orleans, and Jacksonville State University. Dr. Jerolleman’s experience includes the following: working as the lead grant writer and emergency planner for the First Peoples’ Conservation Council, working with the Lowlander Center on coastal community resettlement, community based resilience planning across the United States, serving as a Program Specialist in the Gulf Coast with Save the Children USA, working on a resilience initiative around children’s needs in emergencies; hazard mitigation planning at the local, state and campus level; community education and outreach regarding mitigation measures and preparedness; development of collaborative networks and information sharing avenues among practitioners; and, delivery of training and education to various stakeholders. Dr. Jerolleman is one of the founders of the Natural Hazard Mitigation Association (NHMA) and served as its Executive Director for its first seven years. She is involved in various aspects of planning and policy and the national and local level, including participation in several workshops each year. Dr. Jerolleman speaks on many topics including: hazard mitigation and climate change; campus planning; threat, hazard and vulnerability assessments; hazard mitigation planning; protecting children in disasters; and, public/private partnerships.

ROSINA PHILIPPE

Rosina Philippe is an elder of the Grand Bayou Tribe.

CARMALITA SYLVE

Carmalita Sylve is a member of the Grand Bayou Tribe.

 

art as an exploration of home

NAILAH JEFFERSON

Born and raised in New Orleans, Louisiana, Nailah Jefferson is a filmmaker influenced greatly by her southern roots and upbringing.  Nailah’s debut feature film, the documentary entitled Vanishing Pearls: The Oystermen of Pointe a la Hache, told the story of the little known African American oyster fishing community of Plaquemines Parish and their fight for justice in the aftermath of the 2010 BP Oil Spill. ARRAY acquired Vanishing Pearls in 2014 and it became critically acclaimed, screening both domestically and internationally.  It now streams on Netflix.

As a filmmaker intrigued and inspired by the enduring human spirit, Nailah continues to capture raw subjects and subject matter on screen in both narrative and documentary work.  In fall 2015 Nailah won the inaugural Create Louisiana  50k Short Film grant to direct her first narrative film, Plaquemines which premiered at the  New Orleans Film Festival in fall, 2016.

Recently Nailah was nominated for a 2017 National Magazine Ellie award for directing Essence Magazine’s  Black Girl Magic Episode 4.

Currently, Nailah is in development for her debut feature narrative film Landing on Neptune and her second documentary Commuted.

SEAN LAROCCA

Sean LaRocca has been ArtSpot Productions’ primary music director since 1997.  Works for which he has composed, performed and music-directed include: CHEKHOV’S WILD RIDE (2004); FLIGHT (2008); CRY YOU ONE (2013); and SEA OF COMMON CATASTROPHE (2017).   Since 2000, Sean has also served as ArtSpot’s managing director.

BRYAN LEE JR

Bryan Lee Jr. is currently the Civic Design Director at the Arts Council of New Orleans. Bryan is an Architectural Designer with 8 years in the field working on all phases of architectural design. His experience includes work on projects ranging from residential and academic to commercial, federal and institutional buildings, primarily in the New Orleans region. Before joining the Arts Council, Mr. Lee spent time at the 2014 AIA National Firm of the Year, Eskew+Dumez+Ripple (Architecture) in New Orleans, Billes Partners (Architecture) in New Orleans, and as an architectural multimedia consultant focusing on small scale architectural design renderings, websites, photography and corporate identity work in the New York and New Jersey areas. Since moving to New Orleans, Bryan has been a vocal advocate for Public Interest/Social Impact design through Arts, Public Place-making, and Architecture initiatives in the city. Mr. Lee is a devoted member of the National Organization of Minority Architects (NOMA) and the 2014 NOMA Member of the year. Bryan currently serves as Vice-President/President-Elect of the NOMA Louisiana Chapter and was instrumental in the chapter being acknowledged as the 2014 chapter of the year.

DARCY MCKINNON

 

how to live with water

MIRIAM BELBLIDIA

Miriam Belblidia is a founding partner of Water Works, L3C, founded in 2012 to develop community-driven solutions to address flooding and natural hazards. Previously, she worked as a Hazard Mitigation Specialist for the City of New Orleans, where she helped administer federal hazard mitigation grants, coordinated the 2010 Orleans Parish Hazard Mitigation Plan update, and led efforts to develop the City’s Stormwater Management Program. Miriam Belblidia received a 2010-2011 Fulbright Fellowship in Water Management to conduct research at the Technical University of Delft in the Netherlands. She is a Certified Floodplain Manager (CFM) and received her MPA degree in urban and regional affairs from the University of Pittsburgh (2009), focusing on civil security and disaster management.

ARON CHANG

Aron Chang is an urban designer based in New Orleans. He is a co-founder and director at the Blue House, a Central City collective and work space. He is co-director of Ripple Effect, an organization that promotes water literacy through design-based, in-school instruction. He is also a founding member of the Greater New Orleans Water Collaborative, and serves on the New Orleans City Council’s Environmental Advisory Committee.

From 2011 to 2017, Aron managed urban design and resilience planning projects at Waggonner & Ball, including projects such as Resilient Bridgeport and the Greater New Orleans Urban Water Plan. Aron has taught architecture and landscape architecture studios at the LSU College of Art & Design. He received his Masters in Architecture degree from the Harvard Graduate School of Design in 2009, and graduated from Williams College with degrees in Studio Art and German in 2005.

KYLE GALLOWAY

Kyle Galloway, PE of Gaea Consultants has over 7 years of experience in civil engineering design and hydrologic and hydraulic modeling. Most of his work has focused on storm water management, and his designs range from small rain gardens to major urban drainage systems to nearshore coastal breakwaters. He holds a BS in Civil Engineering from LSU and a Master’s Certificate in Coastal Engineering from Old Dominion University.

Kyle also serves as an engineer officer in the Louisiana Army National Guard. Specializing in expeditionary construction, Kyle has served in Kuwait and Haiti and has responded to local disasters including the Deepwater Horizon oil spill and riverine flooding events in March and August of 2016.

NATHAN LOTT

Nathan came to New Orleans after a decade in natural resource management in the Mid-Atlantic. As a graduate student at Tulane School of Architecture, he gained a deep appreciation for the region’s unique history as well as the challenges of building in a deltaic environment like Southeast Louisiana. In particular, his work on climate change and cultural heritage built upon a longstanding commitment to the joint protection of natural and cultural resources.

That synergistic approach was a hallmark of his seven years as executive director of the Virginia Conservation Network. A coalition of more than 125 nonprofit and community groups, the network championed energy efficiency benchmarks, conservation easements and watershed restoration. During Nathan’s tenure, the network united rural communities concerned about a proposed uranium mine with business interests downstream to protect the drinking water of more than 1 million people. In partnership with foundations and conservation groups across six states, Nathan helped launch the Choose Clean Water coalition, which became a force for clean-up of the Cheasapeake Bay and a resource to local governments.

Previously, Nathan served in a state agency tasked with curbing runoff pollution from farms and cities and with promoting parks and open space, During that time he first encountered many of the principles of green infrastructure. He served as lead author for a greenway-blueway project, Captain John Smith’s Trail on the James River. He also authored a guide book to hiking trails near Richmond, Virginia. Nathan is married to Elizabeth Lott, a minister and Gulf South native. The couple have two school-age children.

JENNIFER TERRY

Impressed by the Greater New Orleans Water Collaborative’s efforts to ensure that New Orleans adopts sustainable water management with input from the community as outlined in the Urban Water Plan, Jennifer Terry was thrilled to join the Water Collaborative’s Steering Committee to ensure that the Committee for a Better New Orleans, where she is a Board Member, remains engaged with the Water Collaborative.

Since 2012, Jennifer has served as the Program Manager for Internet Access and Digital Equity at the City of New Orleans. She works with City colleagues and partners in private, non-profit, and philanthropic organizations to connect New Orleanians to the Internet and its useful information and resources.

Before 2012, Jennifer worked for 10 years as a Transportation/Urban Planner in the public and private sectors. In this capacity, she conducted traffic, transit, pedestrian, and planning analyses for new development, re-development, and transportation infrastructure projects in the New York City Metro area, Virginia, and Florida.

Jennifer formal education includes a Bachelor of Architectural History from the University of Virginia and a Master of Science in Community and Regional Planning from the University of Texas at Austin.

In her free time, Jennifer indulges her passion for cities by wandering around New Orleans to explore its eateries, shops, and architecture. She also pursues these activities when travelling to other fantastic cities in the US and overseas.

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